Used BMW 4x4 Locking Hubs

All used BMW 4x4 Locking Hubs listed on Breakeryard.com are tested, original (OEM) manufacturer parts and come with a 14 day money back guarantee. Breakeryard.com list used car parts for BMW are from premium breaker yards from across the UK, saving you up to 80% compared to main dealer prices.

About 4x4 Locking Hubs

The BMW 4x4 Locking hub can be fitted to four-wheel drive vehicles, enabling the front wheels to be manually engaged and disengaged from the front axle shafts.

4x4 locking hubs are usually cast aluminum or stainless steel and the locking hub assembly is bolted to the front axle shafts of the vehicle.

When four-wheel drive is not needed the driver is able to disconnect the locking hubs, which provides a quieter drive and less road vibration. When four-wheel drive is needed, the driver can lock the BMW 4x4 locking hubs and have the power and drive required to meet the road conditions. By disengaging the locking hubs, the parts not necessary for two-wheel drive stop rotating which is said to assist with fuel efficiency, by reducing mechanical drag. BMW 4x4 locking hubs, also referred to as free wheeling hubs, are said to be of benefit by helping the front axle to last longer as it's not constantly in use so receives less wear and tear. When driving in challenging weather conditions, the driver can leave the hubs locked while in two-wheel drive, enabling an easy shift back into four-wheel drivee whenever the road and driving conditions require it.

4x4 locking hubs generally protrude out of the wheel and can suffer damage when driving, particularly in off-road conditions. Locking hubs can break fairly easily and are also subject to the elements and dirt from the road, so can rust and wear down over time. A broken 4x4 locking hub could lead to a break down situation and should be changed as soon as possible for reasons of safety. Buying the BMW 4x4 locking hub will ensure a part that's specifically designed for the make and model of your vehicle.

BMW trivia

  • Electric cars might be all the rage now, but BMW built their first one in 1972 and called it the BMW 1602e. It didn't quite make it to market though, thanks to the fact that it could only hold a twenty-minute charge.
  • The BMW 3.0CSL was sold in the 70s and had the unusual addition of a spoiler that was kept in the boot. The owner could install it if they wanted to, but BMW couldn't sell the car with the spoiler attached because of road laws!
  • One of the reasons older BMWs keep their value is because it's easy to get spare parts for even the oldest models. That's because BMW has carried on making car parts, even for cars that were built in WWII.
  • Everyone knows what the BMW logo looks like, but do you know what it represents? Most people think it's inspired by propellers (because of BMW's aviation history), but it's really just the same colour scheme as the Bavarian flag and was designed to showcase Bavaria.
  • It might not be the accessory that everyone needs, but for BMW drivers in South Africa who were worried about carjackers, the 'Blaster' was a flamethrower that shot huge flames from either side of the car. Not currently available in the UK…