Used BMW Central Locking ECUs

All used BMW Central Locking ECUs listed on Breakeryard.com are tested, original (OEM) manufacturer parts and come with a 14 day money back guarantee. Breakeryard.com list used car parts for BMW are from premium breaker yards from across the UK, saving you up to 80% compared to main dealer prices.

About Central Locking ECUs

A <Model> central locking ECU (Electronic Control Unit) is a microcomputer or brain responsible for management and control of a car’s central locking and security system. All locking components including the lock mechanisms, lock barrels, lock levers, actuators, remote sensors and other lock controls are electrically connected to the ECU, allowing it to regulate and control the overall state of the system. The central locking ECU may also control electric window closure, vehicle immobiliser and alarm system.

A <Model> central locking ECU is located within the dashboard or engine bay. It is generally possible to ‘read’ or interrogate the central locking ECU using a laptop computer with relevant software and cable or a dedicated reader via a connection port usually located in the dashboard. This is the best method for diagnosis of central locking faults.
Like any electronic component an ECU can fail for a number of reasons including short circuits, dry solder joints, water damage or age. Diagnosis is generally much easier with the correct reader which can be used to obtain error codes from the ECU.

BMW trivia

  • The famous German pilot, the Red Baron, called BMW engines the 'greatest in the world' and ‘the best engine in the war’.
  • The main headquarters for BMW in Munich is designed and shaped to look like car parts. There was a whole new 'four-cylinder' building added on in 1973, and there's definitely the look of an engine about the architecture.
  • The BMW company was founded way back in 1916 and originally manufactured engines for planes. High demand for plane engines during WWI was good news for BMW, but they carried on making plane engines right up until 1945.
  • Electric cars might be all the rage now, but BMW built their first one in 1972 and called it the BMW 1602e. It didn't quite make it to market though, thanks to the fact that it could only hold a twenty-minute charge.
  • The BMW 3.0CSL was sold in the 70s and had the unusual addition of a spoiler that was kept in the boot. The owner could install it if they wanted to, but BMW couldn't sell the car with the spoiler attached because of road laws!