Buy Used and Reconditioned Citroen Radiator Fan Motors at Breakeryard

Used Citroen Radiator Fan Motors

All used Citroen Radiator Fan Motors listed on Breakeryard.com are tested, original (OEM) manufacturer parts and come with a 14 day money back guarantee. Breakeryard.com list used car parts for Citroen are from premium breaker yards from across the UK, saving you up to 80% compared to main dealer prices.

About Radiator Fan Motors

A cars radiator is a central part of the engines cooling system. Responsible for removal of heat from the engine coolant, the radiator system cools the liquid by allowing fresh external air to pass over a network of thin pipes, losing heat to the atmosphere.

A <Model> electric radiator motor an essential part of this system. It is located between the radiator and the bonnet grille, where it powers a fan to draw fresh air across the radiators cores helping to cool the coolant.

A <Model> electric fan motor is controlled by a radiator temperature switch and motor relay to activate the fan when the coolant exceeds a specified temperature.

Issues with a <Model> radiator fan motor include worn motor bushes, electrical issues such as wiring, fuses, temperature switch, relay or damaged fan blades due to exposure to extreme temperatures.

When working on a radiator fan motor care should be taken to ensure it does not automatically activate as the unit may start even when the engine and ignition are off.

Citroen trivia

  • The 1934 Citroën 7CV was the first mass-produced car to have front-wheel drive, hydraulic brakes, and real suspension! This basic design found its way into subsequent models right up until three decades later in the mid-1950s.
  • Unfortunately, the founder of Citroën went bankrupt in 1934, even though the cars they produced were selling well and incredibly popular. The company exists today because tyre company Michelin bought the majority of shares in the company.
  • In 1968, Citroën bought control of the Italian car firm Maserati. That purchase led to the design of the Citroën GT, which came with hydro-pneumatic suspension and a V6 engine. It did well in terms of sales, but production of the last version, the DS23 Pallas Electronique, was stopped in 1975 after the '73 oil crisis.
  • After WWII, Michelin owned Citroën and wanted to make a car for the people. The Citroën 2CV was designed for driving on French roads, so it was incredibly sturdy, and tests were carried out by driving through ploughed fields with trays of eggs on the seats. Although changes in design happened, some version of the Citroën 2CV was in production from 1949 all the way through to 1990.
  • Citroën cars have been put through their paces and all in the name of advertising. Citroën vehicles have trekked huge distances for promotional reasons, including expeditions across the Sahara, throughout Africa, all over Asia, and even across Alaska.