Used Fiat Alternator Brackets

All used Fiat Alternator Brackets listed on Breakeryard.com are tested, original (OEM) manufacturer parts and come with a 14 day money back guarantee. Breakeryard.com list used car parts for Fiat are from premium breaker yards from across the UK, saving you up to 80% compared to main dealer prices.

About Alternator Brackets

The Fiat alternator works in conjunction with the battery to produce power for the electrical parts of the car.   Alternators function by turning the mechanical action of the car's rotating drive shaft into electricity. They do this through the use of rapidly-spinning magnets. This magnetic field in turn produces an electrical current, which is used to power the car electrics. The alternator is also essential for re-charging the car battery, ready to provide the spark necessary to start the car next time.

The Fiat alternator bracket, usually made of steel or aluminium, functions as a casing or mounting for the Fiat alternator.

Usually alternators are fixed using alternator brackets that bolt to a particular part on the engine. One alternator bracket is usually fixed and doesn't move, while the other alternator bracket is able to move in order to control the drive belt.

If the alternator bracket has malfunctioned, it can do so without warning and can cause the drive belt to make a whining noise and eventually break if the problem is not addressed.  As well as potential drive belt damage, a broken alternator bracket can cause the alternator to be sitting misaligned and can affect performance of this part. Constant vibration weakens the Fiat alternator bracket and can cause it to crack and break, but this damage can be slowed down if the alternator is bolted on tight enough to the Model> alternator bracket, which reduces excessive vibration to the alternator and alternator bracket.

Fiat trivia

  • Fiat had a break from selling cars in the US, and was absent from that country for 27 years!
  • During the extended car chase in the film The Italian Job, the Mini Coopers and police Alfa Romeos drive around the rooftop track of the Fiat factory in Turin. Fiat actually offered the
  • film studio all the cars they needed, but the film company went for the Mini instead. However, a Fiat car does show up in the film, driven and owned by mafia boss Altabani.
  • Most Fiats are still manufactured in Italy, but the second-largest producer is Brazil. That's because Fiats are the most popular car make in Brazil, and there are more sales of Fiats there than all of the other manufacturers combined.
  • While the name Fiat is an acronym of 'Fabbrica Italiana Automobili Torino', it also translates to 'so be it' in Italian!