Used Fiat Anti Roll Bar Bushs

All used Fiat Anti Roll Bar Bushs listed on Breakeryard.com are tested, original (OEM) manufacturer parts and come with a 14 day money back guarantee. Breakeryard.com list used car parts for Fiat are from premium breaker yards from across the UK, saving you up to 80% compared to main dealer prices.

About Anti Roll Bar Bushs

A Fiat anti roll bar bush is an essential part of the suspension system of a vehicle. The job of the anti-roll bar is to balance movement of the vehicle when cornering and minimising side to side movement, preventing the vehicle from leaning or rolling over. It is particularly useful in high wind situations. These are fitted on the front and rear of the suspension.

The bushes on an anti-roll bar are made of a strong rubber and secure the anti-roll bar in place. They are always fitted to the front suspension of the vehicle, but it’s becoming more common for them to also be fitted to the rear suspension too. They take a large amount of strain from the forces of the anti-roll bar. This means that over time they will wear thin and become less effective or crack and dry out through use. They’re also subject to disintegration if they come in to contact with oil.

It’s recommended that Fiat anti-roll bar bushes are checked and replaced regularly. Both sides should be replaced at the same time as if one bush is damaged, its pair will most likely be damaged too.

Fiat trivia

  • The 1999 Fiat Multipla has been consistently voted one of the strangest car designs of all time. It’s easy to see why, with the odd light placement, a muffin-shaped top, and two rows of three seats (in the front!). A redesign in 2004 made the Multipla much more popular.
  • While the name Fiat is an acronym of 'Fabbrica Italiana Automobili Torino', it also translates to 'so be it' in Italian!
  • Most Fiats are still manufactured in Italy, but the second-largest producer is Brazil. That's because Fiats are the most popular car make in Brazil, and there are more sales of Fiats there than all of the other manufacturers combined.
  • During the extended car chase in the film The Italian Job, the Mini Coopers and police Alfa Romeos drive around the rooftop track of the Fiat factory in Turin. Fiat actually offered the
  • The British School of Motoring uses Fiats as learner vehicles. They moved from the Vauxhall Corsa to Fiats in 2009, and Fiat has now supplied over 14,000 vehicles to the BSM.