Used Jaguar Central Locking Switchs For Sale

Used Jaguar Central Locking Switchs

All used Jaguar Central Locking Switchs listed on Breakeryard.com are tested, original (OEM) manufacturer parts and come with a 14 day money back guarantee. Breakeryard.com list used car parts for Jaguar are from premium breaker yards from across the UK, saving you up to 80% compared to main dealer prices.

About Central Locking Switchs

The Jaguar central locking switch is a two-way switch that is located in the door trim and allows the user to lock or unlock the door by pushing it. This switch can sometimes have an illustration on it with a closed padlock and an open padlock to show the user which way to push the switch to operate.

In a basic setup, the Jaguar central locking switch sends power to the actuators to control the locking system. However, in a more complex setup, such as those where there are multiple ways to lock and unlock your vehicle, an on-board computer called a body controller will control the power. It also controls many of the functions of a vehicle, including the amount of time the interior lights stay on when the vehicle is started. It also gives you warnings that you’ve left your lights on or if you’ve left the keys in the ignition too.

If the Jaguar central locking switch fails, it’s most likely due to a wiring or electrical fault in the central locking system. This could mean that the doors would be unable to be unlocked, or alternatively will not lock causing a security issue.

Jaguar trivia

  • The 2014 Superbowl advert for Jaguar featured Brit actors Ben Kingsley and Mark Strong, with a terrified Tom Hiddlestone hanging out of a helicopter as it flew across London. Not many people know that the driver used for this advert was The Stig (Ben Collins).
  • Jaguar was bought out by Ford in 1990, but they didn't really capitalise on the investment. Eventually, Ford sold Jaguar to the current owners, the Indian company Tata Motors.
  • When they first launched in 1922, Jaguar was called the Swallow Sidecar Company. They changed the name in 1945 because of the unfortunate use of the letters 'SS' by Germany in the war.
  • Transporting a load of Jaguars isn't easy. When being loaded onto trains, every car is driven by a driver that isn't wearing a seatbelt. Those drivers aren't allowed to wear belts, and they even have to get rid of any metal eyelets on their shoes. This is all to prevent the possibility of scratches, and what's more, the drivers aren't even allowed to touch the outside of the cars!
  • Talk about testing your car! Jaguars are put through a very rigorous climate test, where they are first tested in -40 degrees for twelve hours. Once that's done, the cars are then sprayed with water while standing in a 0-degree wind tunnel. That's why they cope so well with British weather.