Used Land Rover Bootlid Tailgate Hinges

All used Land Rover Bootlid Tailgate Hinges listed on Breakeryard.com are tested, original (OEM) manufacturer parts and come with a 14 day money back guarantee. Breakeryard.com list used car parts for Land Rover are from premium breaker yards from across the UK, saving you up to 80% compared to main dealer prices.

About Bootlid Tailgate Hinges

The Land Rover bootlid tailgate is the lifting cover for the boot space on a saloon vehicle or the lifting door on a hatchback or estate vehicle. In the latter it will include the rear window, referred to as the tailgate hatch glass, in the former it will be a solid piece of bodywork. 

The bootlid tailgate is mounted to the frame of the car with Land Rover bootlid tailgate hinges, which are fixed to the car with either bolts or pins, to the boot space/luggage compartment at the rear of the vehicle. The   Land Rover bootlid tailgate hinges attach to either side of the bootlid tailgate and function to enable it to be mounted to the car and the bootlid to be opened and closed easily with the hinged mechanism.  The Land Rover tailgate hatch glass is set into the hinged Land Rover bootlid tailgate, forming a window, which lifts, opening the rear end of the passenger compartment.

The Land Rover bootlid tailgate hinges enable the door to be joined to the car, while the movable mechanism of the door hinge allows the door to swing open and closed. A hinge will have a great deal of stress and strain put on to it so it needs to be strong and durable. Door hinges are usually made of stainless steel because this metal does a good job at withstanding rust. There are many different types of hinges, but the hinges used in doors are usually made up of two sheets of shaped metal with holes for the bolts or pins, joined together by a barrell which is secured by a pivot, which enables the movement, allowing the door to be opened or closed. 

The hinge mechanism can wear out over time, and parts such as the pins or bolts can stop functioning properly due to old age or corrosion, making it difficult to open or close the bootlid tailgate with ease. If the bootlid tailgate hinges on your car seize up due to rust, the pin in the pivot joints will break. If there's a rattling sound coming from the bootlid tailgate, it's worth checking the  hinges as loose hinges can cause the bootlid tailgate to vibrate and shake. Misaligned or loose hinges can lead to the door moving from it's proper position, which can cause it to bounce back when you try to shut it, requiring you to lift the door up in order to close it. When you need to replace the hinges on your bootlid tailgate, buying a set of Land Rover bootlid tailgate hinges will ensure you get the right part for the make and model of your car.

Land Rover trivia

  • Land Rovers and James Bond go hand in hand. The 4x4 Land Rover has been in more Bond films than there have been Bond actors! In Spectre, the Defender SVX was customised with 37-inch tyres and more power.
  • The Range Rover designer hated what he had made. Charles Spencer "Spen" King CBE, was focused solely on designing a large V8 engine, and then just drew a box around it to show where the engine would sit. It annoyed him for the rest of his life, and he insisted that he'd only put 0.1% of development time on the car shape. He also hated that they would be used for anything other than farming, saying, "...to use them in the school run, or even in towns and cities at all, is completely stupid."
  • In 2012, Land Rover hired Posh Spice as their temporary creative director. Victoria Beckham was the key to the design of the Evoque Special edition. It came with a hand-finished matte paint job, mohair floor mats, and a matching four-piece luggage set.
  • The designer Charles S. King worked with Rolls Royce to design jet engines before going on to build the Range Rover. King would go onto building a car around those jet engines that then held the world land speed record, the first turbine-powered vehicle to do so.
  • Although the first Land Rover was designed in 1947 (by Maurice Wilks), the company wasn't actually founded until 1978!