Used Land Rover Camshafts

All used Land Rover Camshafts listed on Breakeryard.com are tested, original (OEM) manufacturer parts and come with a 14 day money back guarantee. Breakeryard.com list used car parts for Land Rover are from premium breaker yards from across the UK, saving you up to 80% compared to main dealer prices.

About Camshafts

The engine is the power machine of a car, literally converting energy, in the form of fuel, into movement, and is known as an internal combustion engine. The engine is made up of several components that all work together to enable combustion to occur and in turn the car to move. The camshaft plays a big part in how well the engine performs. Located in the engine compartment, the camshaft is usually either a steel or cast iron cylindrical structure in the form of a rod which runs along the cylinders. 

The camshaft's job is to manage the poppet valves, opening and closing the intake and exhaust valves in the cylinder head. The cylinder head is comprised of a series of passages that carry the air and fuel combination needed for combustion to the cylinders; the liquid  coolant, needed to keep the engine cool; and harmful fumes (produced by the engine in the process of combustion) from the exhaust  valves to the exhaust manifold and away from the vehicle. An integral part of the engine's timing system, the camshaft works to manage this process by making sure that the intake and exhaust valves are opening and closing at exactly the right time. The engine needs the correct amount of air and fuel flowing through it in order for the fuel to burn in the cylinders and for the engine to ignite or spark at the right time. The outer surface of the camshaft has protruding curves or lobes around it (one for each of the valves) which engage with, essentially lifting, the valves as the camshaft turns, opening and closing the intake and exhaust valves. The camshaft pulley controls how fast the camshaft rotates and enables the smooth rotation of the cylindrical camshaft.  The camshaft receives power from the crankshaft, connected by the cam belt/timing belt, and as the camshaft rotates on the camshaft pulley, it opens and closes the valves. The cam shaft pulley works in conjunction with the timing belt to make sure the camshaft is rotating in synch with the crankshaft (the part that controls the engine's pistons and turns power from the pistons into the rotational power required to make the car move).

The lobes on the camshaft will suffer from wear as they are subjected to extremely high temperatures and friction. It is not uncommon for the camshaft to receive damage from another part coming loose and knocking it as it spins, such as the connecting rod, which can cause the camshaft to break in two if cracked. Damage from rust can lead to camshaft malfunction. When you need a new camshaft, the Land Rover camshaft is the ideal replacement part, specifically manufactured for the make and model of your vehicle.

Land Rover trivia

  • Land Rover was the two-decade standout winner of the Camel Trophy, a gruelling off-road challenge that sees vehicles compete in Siberia, the Sahara, Australia, and other hostile terrains.
  • Inspired by the Jeeps that had been used in WWII, the first Land Rover's steering wheel was in the middle of the dashboard. This was partly to counter the need to create left and right-hand drive models for different countries.
  • One of the most unique vehicles ever was the floating SUV designed and built by Land Rover. Unfortunately, the Floating Ninety Defender led many drivers to believe that their own Land Rovers could also float, and many cars were driven into lakes as a result.
  • The designer Charles S. King worked with Rolls Royce to design jet engines before going on to build the Range Rover. King would go onto building a car around those jet engines that then held the world land speed record, the first turbine-powered vehicle to do so.
  • The Range Rover designer hated what he had made. Charles Spencer "Spen" King CBE, was focused solely on designing a large V8 engine, and then just drew a box around it to show where the engine would sit. It annoyed him for the rest of his life, and he insisted that he'd only put 0.1% of development time on the car shape. He also hated that they would be used for anything other than farming, saying, "...to use them in the school run, or even in towns and cities at all, is completely stupid."