Used Land Rover Central Locking ECUs

All used Land Rover Central Locking ECUs listed on Breakeryard.com are tested, original (OEM) manufacturer parts and come with a 14 day money back guarantee. Breakeryard.com list used car parts for Land Rover are from premium breaker yards from across the UK, saving you up to 80% compared to main dealer prices.

About Central Locking ECUs

A <Model> central locking ECU (Electronic Control Unit) is a microcomputer or brain responsible for management and control of a car’s central locking and security system. All locking components including the lock mechanisms, lock barrels, lock levers, actuators, remote sensors and other lock controls are electrically connected to the ECU, allowing it to regulate and control the overall state of the system. The central locking ECU may also control electric window closure, vehicle immobiliser and alarm system.

A <Model> central locking ECU is located within the dashboard or engine bay. It is generally possible to ‘read’ or interrogate the central locking ECU using a laptop computer with relevant software and cable or a dedicated reader via a connection port usually located in the dashboard. This is the best method for diagnosis of central locking faults.
Like any electronic component an ECU can fail for a number of reasons including short circuits, dry solder joints, water damage or age. Diagnosis is generally much easier with the correct reader which can be used to obtain error codes from the ECU.

Land Rover trivia

  • Land Rovers and James Bond go hand in hand. The 4x4 Land Rover has been in more Bond films than there have been Bond actors! In Spectre, the Defender SVX was customised with 37-inch tyres and more power.
  • Land Rover was the two-decade standout winner of the Camel Trophy, a gruelling off-road challenge that sees vehicles compete in Siberia, the Sahara, Australia, and other hostile terrains.
  • Land Rover was notorious for trying to find ways to avoid paying taxes and extended that to their customers too. They built the Defender 110 so that it could (just about) fit 12 people! Technically, that meant that they could class it as a bus, and owners didn't have to pay standard road tax.
  • One of the most unique vehicles ever was the floating SUV designed and built by Land Rover. Unfortunately, the Floating Ninety Defender led many drivers to believe that their own Land Rovers could also float, and many cars were driven into lakes as a result.
  • In the 1950s, you could buy yourself a Land Rover with tank tracks instead of wheels. Known as the Cuthbertson Version, it was intended for use by farmers and was tested by driving across the Scottish Highlands.