Used Land Rover Gear Sticks

All used Land Rover Gear Sticks listed on Breakeryard.com are tested, original (OEM) manufacturer parts and come with a 14 day money back guarantee. Breakeryard.com list used car parts for Land Rover are from premium breaker yards from across the UK, saving you up to 80% compared to main dealer prices.

About Gear Sticks

The Land Rover gear stick is a metal lever that attaches to the gearbox in a manual vehicle. It is usually located between the front passenger and driver seat and is on the left hand side of the driver in a UK standard vehicle and is used by the driver to change gears whilst driving. Some vehicles, particularly those in the United States, have gear sticks that are attached to the steering column. 

To operate the Land Rover gear stick, the driver should depress the clutch pedal. This disengages the engine and enables the vehicle to change gears. 

On top of the Land Rover gear stick is a gear knob, which has a diagram of the positions of the gears on the top of it for the driver’s convenience. For the driver to change gears he/she has to move the Land Rover gear stick in the relevant directions shown by the diagram. They will feel the gear engaging when the Land Rover gear stick pushes in to place.

Some 4 x 4s use a second Land Rover gear stick which engages another gearbox for off-road terrain.

Problems with the Land Rover gear stick may result in an inability to change gears.

Land Rover trivia

  • In 2012, Land Rover hired Posh Spice as their temporary creative director. Victoria Beckham was the key to the design of the Evoque Special edition. It came with a hand-finished matte paint job, mohair floor mats, and a matching four-piece luggage set.
  • Land Rover was the two-decade standout winner of the Camel Trophy, a gruelling off-road challenge that sees vehicles compete in Siberia, the Sahara, Australia, and other hostile terrains.
  • One of the most unique vehicles ever was the floating SUV designed and built by Land Rover. Unfortunately, the Floating Ninety Defender led many drivers to believe that their own Land Rovers could also float, and many cars were driven into lakes as a result.
  • In the 1950s, you could buy yourself a Land Rover with tank tracks instead of wheels. Known as the Cuthbertson Version, it was intended for use by farmers and was tested by driving across the Scottish Highlands.
  • Although the first Land Rover was designed in 1947 (by Maurice Wilks), the company wasn't actually founded until 1978!