Used Land Rover Track Control Arms

All used Land Rover Track Control Arms listed on Breakeryard.com are tested, original (OEM) manufacturer parts and come with a 14 day money back guarantee. Breakeryard.com list used car parts for Land Rover are from premium breaker yards from across the UK, saving you up to 80% compared to main dealer prices.

About Track Control Arms

In motor vehicle suspension systems, a control arm is a suspension connection between the chassis and the suspension upright or hub that carries the wheel. The basic function of the track control arm is to provide improved road holding and shock absorption.

The component is known as the Land Rover track control arm. The track control arm has a wishbone or “A” shape on the bottom, which bears most of the impact of the shock. It absorbs the shock and keeps the wheels firmly on the road for a more comfortable ride.

The performance of the track control arm is augmented by the control arm bushings, which are an equally important part of the vehicle's suspension system. These are situated between the control arm and the frame of the vehicle and have the effect of further dampening vibration between the wheels and the frame, cushioning the ride, minimising driving noise and preventing metal from coming into contact with metal.

Signs that the control arm bushings may be failing are handling problems, loose steering and uneven tyre wear. Shaking, thumping or rattling noises may also be evident, especially when turning or braking. Replacement is the only possible option when the Land Rover track control arm component begins to fail.

Land Rover trivia

  • Land Rover was the two-decade standout winner of the Camel Trophy, a gruelling off-road challenge that sees vehicles compete in Siberia, the Sahara, Australia, and other hostile terrains.
  • Although the first Land Rover was designed in 1947 (by Maurice Wilks), the company wasn't actually founded until 1978!
  • Most cars get an immediate redesign after the prototype is designed. Not with the Range Rover, however! The 1966 design was considered perfect as it was, which never happens in the automotive industry. The Range Rover is considered a work of art, and one of them is even on display in the Louvre.
  • In the 1950s, you could buy yourself a Land Rover with tank tracks instead of wheels. Known as the Cuthbertson Version, it was intended for use by farmers and was tested by driving across the Scottish Highlands.
  • Inspired by the Jeeps that had been used in WWII, the first Land Rover's steering wheel was in the middle of the dashboard. This was partly to counter the need to create left and right-hand drive models for different countries.