Used Mazda Axle Bushs

All used Mazda Axle Bushs listed on Breakeryard.com are tested, original (OEM) manufacturer parts and come with a 14 day money back guarantee. Breakeryard.com list used car parts for Mazda are from premium breaker yards from across the UK, saving you up to 80% compared to main dealer prices.

About Axle Bushs

The Mazda axle bush is a steel and rubber unit which is of a stubby tubular shape, with a central smaller steel tube suspended in hard moulded rubber which accommodates the connecting bolt.

It's located on the joint between the axle and the chassis or subframe.

The Mazda axle bush allows the axle to move with the suspension keeping the vehicle from deviating and allowing the suspension to absorb fluctuations in the road surface and the forces associated with turning.

Over time the Mazda axle bush can become worn and the rubber begin to break down and become detached from the steel structure of the bush. This can result in metal to metal contact causing an audible knocking sound when the suspension moves and an instability in the handling of the vehicle. The renewal of the bushes require specialist tools and may require disconnection of the braking system.

Mazda trivia

  • Mazda has always been big fans of the rotary engine, and although they originally started using them to help distinguish themselves from other car manufacturers, they are still the only car manufacturer to mass-produce rotary engine-powered vehicles.
  • The attempt by Mazda to make a fast electric car was very successful. The Mazda RX-7 was built in 1979 and could reach an impressive 111.8mph.
  • In 2010, 459 Mazda MX-5s all gathered at the UNESCO Zollverein World Heritage Site in Germany. This is the largest parade of Mazdas in the manufacturer's history.
  • The name Mazda comes from both the name of the founder (Jujiro Matsuda) and the Zoroastrian God of Wisdom, Ahura Mazda.
  • The first vehicle that Mazda ever produced was a three-wheeled truck called the Mazda-go. Only 66 were built in total for its release in 1931.