Used Nissan Almera Seat Belt Anchor

All used Nissan Almera Seat Belt Anchor listed on Breakeryard.com are tested, original (OEM) manufacturer parts and come with a 14 day money back guarantee. Breakeryard.com listed used car parts for Nissan Almera are from premium breaker yards from across the UK, saving you up to 80% compared to main dealer prices.

About Seat Belt Anchor

Seatbelt anchors are where the seatbelt system is connected to the main vehicle frame. There are three seatbelt anchor points in a normal seatbelt system, one where the seatbelt reel is situated at the bottom of the door column, one at the top of the door column where the chest or upper body section of the seatbelt is suspended from, and one that accepts the seatbelt buckle with both chest and lap sections of the seatbelt attached.

The front anchor is to the left/right of the seat and is bolted to the floor or centre column by means of anchor-plates and bolts. The use of steel anchor plates ensures that the bolts will not shear off or pull through the floor if the belt comes under load.  The correct positioning of seatbelt anchor points is necessary for a vehicle to pass an MOT. Attached to the anchor point is a mechanism which will receive the seatbelt buckle and lock it into place securely.

To undo the seatbelt press down on the button or switch on the seatbelt anchor mechanism which will automatically release the seatbelt buckle.

Nissan trivia

  • Nissan used to be called Datson, which was then changed to Datsun because son in Japanese means disadvantage. Eventually, there was a complete rebrand, and the name Nissan was born.
  • Nissan built the very first limo and made it specifically for the Emperor of Japan. The car was powered by a growling V8 engine and was just over six metres long.
  • Car accessories can range from the amazing to the redundant, but nothing manages to balance somewhere between the two more than the doorframe umbrella compartment that came with the Nissan Pulsar GTi-R.
  • Most people think of the Skyline when they think of the Nissan, but the car featured in the Fast and the Furious franchise wasn't actually designed or built by Nissan. Instead, it was built by a car company called Prince, which Nissan merged with in 1966. The name Prince was phased out, and the Nissan Skyline was born.
  • Nissan’s sporting history kicked off in the right way when they blasted their way to victory in the All Japan Automobile Competition, Japan’s first-ever racing event. The NL-75 destroyed the competition, thanks to its supercharged DOHC engine.