Buy Used Rover 800 Headlight Adjuster and Other Car Parts

Used Rover 800 Headlight Adjuster

All used Rover 800 Headlight Adjuster listed on Breakeryard.com are tested, original (OEM) manufacturer parts and come with a 14 day money back guarantee. Breakeryard.com listed used car parts for Rover 800 are from premium breaker yards from across the UK, saving you up to 80% compared to main dealer prices.

About Headlight Adjuster

The 800 Rover headlight adjuster is located inside the headlight assembly and is used to adjust the headlights up and down. There are two types of headlight adjustment systems, one is manual and involves adjusting the headlight bolts that are above the headlight and on the side using a screwdriver to adjust the headlights up and down and sideways.

The other type is a motorised 800 Rover headlight adjuster. Like the bolt version, this headlight adjuster is also located in the headlight assembly. The movement of the headlights are controlled by a motor that is attached to the power supply, and can be adjusted using a switch inside the vehicle on the driverside to position the lights in all directions.

Failure of the 800 Rover headlight adjuster can mean that you are unable to adjust your headlights. If the adjuster ceases working, it’s possible that the headlight will move out of position. This can cause visibility issues when driving, and also could cause difficulties for other drivers on the road who could be blinded by too-high headlights. Poorly positioned headlights are also an MOT failure. It’s therefore essential to replace a damaged 800 Rover headlight adjuster as soon as possible.

Rover trivia

  • In 1952, noted car journalist, Bob Dearborn, famously wrote in his Road & Track review that, "… I honestly believe (barring the Rolls-Royce) that there is no finer car built in the world today."
  • Rover was part of the government's rearmament programme in the run-up to WWII and even ran two shadow factories to start building what the government needed. One of the shadow factories was in Birmingham, but the larger of the two was in Solihull.
  • John Kemp Starley, one of the two founders of Rover, made an electric-powered car in 1888!
  • The Rover P8 has some really obvious inspirations. The front bumper is clearly a Pontiac and the side profile is eerily similar to the Opel Rekord. The plan was to keep the P8 shorter than their previous Rover 2000, but it ended up being longer.
  • Honda and British Leyland decided to use the Rover name when they worked together on the range of planned cars to be released in the ‘80s. As a result, the Rover 200 replaced the Triumph Acclaim.