Used Suzuki Axle Bushs

All used Suzuki Axle Bushs listed on Breakeryard.com are tested, original (OEM) manufacturer parts and come with a 14 day money back guarantee. Breakeryard.com list used car parts for Suzuki are from premium breaker yards from across the UK, saving you up to 80% compared to main dealer prices.

About Axle Bushs

The Suzuki axle bush is a steel and rubber unit which is of a stubby tubular shape, with a central smaller steel tube suspended in hard moulded rubber which accommodates the connecting bolt.

It's located on the joint between the axle and the chassis or subframe.

The Suzuki axle bush allows the axle to move with the suspension keeping the vehicle from deviating and allowing the suspension to absorb fluctuations in the road surface and the forces associated with turning.

Over time the Suzuki axle bush can become worn and the rubber begin to break down and become detached from the steel structure of the bush. This can result in metal to metal contact causing an audible knocking sound when the suspension moves and an instability in the handling of the vehicle. The renewal of the bushes require specialist tools and may require disconnection of the braking system.

Suzuki trivia

  • An advert in Australia got Suzuki into trouble after it showed what the court called 'reckless speed' and 'unsafe driving'. The advert also got a high number of viewer complaints, but not about the driving. Most of the complaints were about the rude nature of the advert.
  • Although they still make vehicles for the US army, Suzuki stopped selling civilian cars in America in 2012.
  • Suzuki sells more cars in India than in any other country. They started selling there in 1981 after realising the huge potential market. They now have around 47% of the market share, with their closest competitors being Hyundai who have just 17%.
  • A lengthy and controversial court case seriously affected Suzuki's reputation. An article in Consumer Reports in 1996 said that the Suzuki Samurai 4x4 was easily tipped over. Sales dropped after the review, and Suzuki sued the magazine. They hoped to get more than £60million, but after eight years, the case was settled out of court.
  • General Motors still has a 3% share in Suzuki, although this is considerably less than they used to have. Suzuki bought back 17% of the shares that GM had after the company started losing money in 2006.