Used Renault Grand Scenic Fuel Sender Unit

All used Renault Grand Scenic Fuel Sender Unit listed on Breakeryard.com are tested, original (OEM) manufacturer parts and come with a 14 day money back guarantee. Breakeryard.com listed used car parts for Renault Grand Scenic are from premium breaker yards from across the UK, saving you up to 80% compared to main dealer prices.

About Fuel Sender Unit

The Grand Scenic Renault fuel sender unit functions to measure the level of fuel in the fuel tank. Its purpose is to provide the driver with accurate fuel level read outs to help prevent the car running out of fuel.

Usually attached to the fuel pump, and normally located in the fuel tank, the fuel sender unit measures the level of fuel in the tank, usually with the aid of a float and a clever resistor-type sensor.

The fuel level data is sent to the car's fuel gauge, normally located on the dashboard.  The fuel gauge shows the level of fuel in the tank. As the fuel is used, the floats lower in the fuel sender unit and the fuel gauge reflects this by slowly moving down. This enables the driver to see how much fuel is left in the tank. The driver would use this information to fill the car up with fuel as and when required. It helps the driver to make sure the fuel levels don't get too low. The worst case scenario is running out of fuel. Running out of fuel can damage the engine. Running a car on low levels of fuel can also be harmful to engine components and the fuel system, including the fuel filter and fuel pump.

Problems with the fuel system should be fixed as soon as possible. If the fuel sender unit is faulty this can affect the accuracy of the information displayed on the fuel gauge and could lead to the car running out of fuel. When replacing this part, it is vital that the replacement part is compatible with the car. Specifically engineered for the make and model of your vehicle, the Grand Scenic Renault fuel sender unit is the ideal choice.

Renault trivia

  • Renault also owns Automobile Daci and Renault Samsung Motors, among their other global acquisitions.
  • The Royal family have always enjoyed a Renault, but the first royal sale was in 1905 when King Edward VII bagged himself a Landaulette. Our current monarch didn’t pay for one; however, they did receive a Renault Dauphine as a gift in 1957.
  • Widely considered the first-ever Grand Prix, the 1906 Le Mans was won by the Renault AK90CV, driven by French driving legend Ferenc Szisz. The race consisted of 12 laps of a daunting 64-mile circuit.
  • If you’ve seen a six-wheeled Renault 5 in the UK, you might not have imagined it. Not many were made, and they are all in the hands of private collectors, one of which is rumoured to be a British car aficionado.
  • Louis Renault was sure that films were going to be big, so he agreed to let the Lumiere brothers use the Renault Type A in one of their first films. Now, Renault cars are seen in hundreds of films and TV shows every year.