Used MINI Cross Members

All used MINI Cross Members listed on Breakeryard.com are tested, original (OEM) manufacturer parts and come with a 14 day money back guarantee. Breakeryard.com list used car parts for MINI are from premium breaker yards from across the UK, saving you up to 80% compared to main dealer prices.

About Cross Members

The MINI cross member is a structural part of the car body which holds the engine and/or transmission in place.

The MINI cross member is more often than not made of steel, and usually contained within a box that is bolted across the underside of the car, to the bottom of the chassis.

The MINI cross member forms part of the bodywork of the car and therefore is built to be strong and solid and able to withstand the weight of the engine and/or transmission. Being a structural part, the MINI cross member assists with the overall handling of the car and helps to keep the body panels solidly in place and in the correct position.

It is vital that the MINI cross member is in sound condition and working properly as it is paramount to the structural safety of the car. Prone to rust caused by water from the road and damaged caused by debris from the road, over time the MINI cross member will eventually need replacing.  If damaged the MINI cross member will need replacing with one that is compatible with the make and model of your vehicle.

MINI trivia

  • Mary Quant, the inventor of the miniskirt, credited the Mini for the inspiration behind the iconic fashion accessory.
  • It might have been a tight fit, but 27 people can fit into a Mini. The Guinness Book of Records confirmed that 27 could fit into the classic model Mini, although 28 people managed to get into the BMW Mini in 2012. The 27-person record was performed by Dani and the Miniskirts during the London to Brighton Mini-Run.
  • The Morris Minor Mini was the first British car to sell over one million units. It reached that landmark number back in 1961.
  • The Oxford MINI factory has made more than 3 million cars.
  • The Mini's designer, Sir Alec Issigonis, didn't like car windows that had to be rolled down. In fact, he didn't think that cars should have side windows at all!